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Saturday, August 29, 2009

AUGUST 28 - Symbols for “cometary outburst” appeared

Dear Friends,

Paste the link if you don't receive the images.

http://www.cropcircleconnector.com/2009/windmillhill2/articles.html

Love and Light.

David

Image Jose Jaime Maussan Copyright 2009


Symbols for “cometary outburst” appeared once again in English crop pictures during the summer of 2009: can we use that information to predict the exploding comet beforehand?

Abstract. Many different crop pictures from the summer of 2009 seemed to show symbols for comets or “cometary outburst”. This would seem to imply that some faint comet may explode (or outburst) soon in Earth’s skies. No astronomer or astronomical organization on Earth today has predicted such an explosion. Thus if such an event comes to pass, it will provide rigorous proof that: (a) modern crop pictures are paranormally real, and (b) that they can sometimes predict the future.

Using detailed information concerning orbital paths, orbital periods or dates of close approach to Sun or Earth as provided by those crop pictures, we will try here to evaluate scientifically and objectively, using a comprehensive astronomical database, which faint comet might be about to explode.

Modern crop pictures sometimes show detailed images which predict the future. Sometimes those images portray human events far in advance of their time, for example a recent decoding of the Greek Antikythera device (see time2007u or time2007w). Yet more often they portray unexpected astronomical events before they happen: for example a solar flare on our Sun (see southfield), a giant sunspot (see eastfield), or a strong solar wind that led to an aurora borealis (see badbury).

Comet Shoemaker-Levy 9 in 1994: an impact on Jupiter shown in crops

Some of the first future-predictive crop pictures concerned an impact of comet Shoemaker-Levy 9 on Jupiter in July of 1994 (see seds.org or Comet_Shoemaker-Levy_9). A whole series of crop pictures from the early summer of 1994 portrayed that event accurately, including not only images of the comet, but also the detailed shape of its largest impact scar on Jupiter (see time2007i or scorpious_hour).

Comet 73P Schwassmann-Wachmann 3 in 1995: an outburst and fragmentation near Earth orbit shown in crops

Another series of future-predictive crop pictures appeared during the summer of 1995. Many of those 1995 crop pictures showed images from three months into the future, concerning a comet that was about to explode or “outburst” near Earth orbit. On September 20, 1995, comet 73P Schwassmann-Wachmann 3 unexpectedly outburst as it was approaching the heat of the Sun, then broke into more than 60 small pieces. Some of those cometary fragments passed close to Earth again in January of 2001, then May of 2006 (see ast.cam.ac.uk or cometography).

The sudden break-up of comet 73P Schwassmann-Wachmann 3 had in fact been predicted three months earlier in English crop pictures: for example at Bishop’s Sutton on June 20, or at Longwood Warren on June 26. Indeed, the famous “missing Earth” feature of Longwood Warren told exactly where in space, that Earth-orbit-crossing comet would outburst three months later (see longwoodwarren2006 or time2007a).

Comet 17P Holmes in 2007: a bright outburst between the orbits of Mars and Jupiter shown in crops

Comet 17P Holmes appeared very unexceptional at a faint magnitude of 17 during early 2007 (see ast.cam.ac.uk). Yet after reaching perihelion (closest approach to the Sun) on May 4, it outburst suddenly six months later on October 24, then joined in Earth’s sky (or conjuncted) with a bright star Mirfak in Perseus on November 20 (see cometography).

Both of those spectacular astronomical events had been predicted in English crop pictures more two years earlier, during the summer of 2005 (see time2007g or time2007h).

Symbols for “cometary outburst” appeared once again in English crop pictures during the summer of 2009: is another comet about to explode?

Following on from those three previous examples in 1994, 1995 or 2005, symbols for “cometary outburst” appeared once again in English crop pictures during the summer of 2009. Two kinds of symbol were shown: (a) short or long “teardrops” which resemble a bright comet with a short or long tail, or (b) a series of five expanding circles that resemble the early stages of cometary outburst.

Cometary images as “short teardrops” were shown at Ogbourne St. Andrew on July 29 (see /ogbourne2009):

Cometary images as “long teardrops” were shown at West Down Gallops on July 4 (see westdown2009) or Silbury on July 5 (see silburyhill2009):

Likewise, some five-circle symbols for “cometary outburst” that had been used to predict in 2005 the subsequent outburst of comet 17P Holmes, appeared again during the summer of 2009 at Windmill Hill and other places:

A series of five expanding circles has often been used to symbolize “cometary outburst”. Such five-circle symbols appeared during the summer of 2009 at Silbury on August 3 (see silbury2009), Rollright Stone Circle on August 3 (see rollright2009), Windmill Hill on August 6 (see windmill2009b), or Wilbur in Washington state on July 23, 2009 (see Wilbur2009):

The date of cometary outburst may be as early as September or October of 2009

Now if an unknown comet will soon explode or outburst in Earth’s skies, when might such an unexpected event be scheduled to happen? All of the current evidence suggests fairly soon, perhaps in September or October of 2009.

For example, West Down Gallops of July 4 showed a long teardrop shape (“bright comet”) that will “fly like a swallow” through Earth’s skies, after another two lunar months of 29 days (close to the full Moon of September 4).

Silbury of July 5 showed the same long teardrop shape (“bright comet”), along with a binary code that could be read to give a date of September 6, 2009 (see silburyhill). Four years earlier in 2005, a similar binary code had been shown at Wayland’s Smithy, in order to predict the outburst of comet 17P Holmes in 2007 (see time2007g or time2007h).

Ogbourne St. Andrew of July 29 showed a two-tailed comet which will supposedly orbit around the Sun: sometime after the lunar eclipse of August 6, 2009, and as we approach the full Moon of September 4.

Finally, Silbury of August 3 showed fine details of crop within its five expanding circles for “7-7” (the full Moon of July 7), followed by “6 around 1” (the full Moon of August 6), followed by an empty space (see silbury or earthfiles.com). Those symbols could imply that we will see a cometary outburst just after the next full Moon of September 4.

Other crop pictures, however, for example Morgan’s Hill of August 2, 2009 (see morganhill2009), seemed to show a Mayan “bright star” in 80 days, leading to a somewhat later date estimate of October 20.

Likewise, Wayland’s Smithy of August 12, 2009 (see waylandsmithy2009c) showed 52-56 then 72-76 days, leading to date estimates of October 5 then October 25 (perhaps for a second outburst).

Silbury of July 5, 2009 showed similarly a second “teardrop” next to the first, which was associated with a slightly later date in binary code of November 17, perhaps for a second outburst (see silburyhill).

Can we identify the exploding comet beforehand?

Supposing that a faint comet is soon to explode in Earth’s skies, just like comet 73P Schwassmann-Wachmann in 1995, or comet 17P Holmes in 2007, can we use the many kinds of astronomical information given in 2009 crop pictures, to identify it before it explodes?

Interestingly enough, the slightly elliptical orbit of that comet about the Sun seems to have been drawn in two different crop pictures from 2009, namely at Silbury on August 3, or at Windmill Hill of August 6:

In other words, the two large circles shown there might plausibly represent the orbits of planet Jupiter and some “exploding comet”, especially since the smaller circle in each case lies slightly off-centre from a central “Sun”. Three tight inner circles which surround that central “Sun” in Silbury of August 3 could represent the orbits of Mercury, Venus and Earth.

Should we next compare the shapes of those two large circles in crop, to known orbits for Jupiter and many different comets, to try and identify the faint comet before it explodes? The NASA Near Earth Object website offers an easily accessible database of cometary orbits on its Orbit Diagrams page (see orbits).

In order to research this topic comprehensively, we will consider all known comets that will reach perihelion (closest approach to the Sun) during a wide range of dates from March 2009 to September 2010 (see ast.cam.ac.uk or ast.cam.ac.uk).

Our first criterion: look for an overall similarity of shape between the crop picture “orbit” and the comet orbit

To get started, we will look simply for an overall similarity of shape between two large outer circles that were drawn in crop at Silbury on August 3, 2009, or Windmill Hill on August 6, 2009, to the orbits of planet Jupiter and a wide range of comets listed in the NEO database.

Results of the orbital comparison for all known comets:

59P Kearns-Kwee March 8, 2009 (no match to orbit)

2008 J3 March 11, 2009 (no match to orbit)

2002 Q1 March 21, 2009 (no match to orbit)

145P Shoemaker-Levy March 27, 2009 (no match to orbit)

2008 G2 April 10, 2009 (no match to orbit)

2004 CB April 16, 2009 (no match to orbit)

18D Perrine-Mrkos April 17, 2009 (no match to orbit)

2008 O2 April 24, 2009 (no match to orbit)

137P Shoemaker-Levy May 14, 2009 (no match to orbit)

22P Kopff May 25, 2009 (no match to orbit)

143P Kowal-Mrkos June 12, 2009 (no match to orbit)

64P Swift-Gehrels June 14, 2009 (no match to orbit)

2003 A1 June 16, 2009 (no match to orbit)

2003 H4 June 22, 2009 (no match to orbit)

2008 Q3 June 23, 2009 (no match to orbit)

2008 P1 July 3, 2009 (no match to orbit)

2006 W3 July 7, 2009 (no match to orbit)

77P Longmore July 8, 2009 (no match to orbit)

116P Wild 4 July 19, 2009 (possible match to orbit)

1999 XB69 July 26, 2009 (no match to orbit)

74P Smirnova-Chernykh July 30, 2009 (possible match to orbit)

24P Schaumasse August 10, 2009 (no match to orbit)

89P Russell August 17, 2009 (no match to orbit)

2002 T1 Augusr 25, 2009 (no match to orbit)

2004 X1 September 3, 2009 (no match to orbit)

2001 MD7 September 9, 2009 (no match to orbit)

2008 N1 September 25, 2009 (no match to orbit)

2007 Q3 October 7, 2009 (no match to orbit)

88P Howell October 12, 2009 (possible match, but too elliptical)

127P Holt-Olmstead October 21, 2009 (good match to orbit)

54P de Vico November 28, 2009 (possible match, too close to Jupiter)

169P NEAT November 30, 2009 (no match to orbit)

100P Hartley December 6, 2009 (possible match to orbit)

2004 K2 December 15, 2009 (possible match, but too elliptical)

2005 JQ5 December 29, 2009 (no match to orbit)

118P Shoemaker-Levy January 2, 2010 (good match to orbit)

82P Gehrels January 12, 2010 (possible match to orbit)

2003 XD10 January 31, 2010 (good match to orbit)

2009 K2 February 7, 2010 (no match to orbit)

203P Korlevic February 8, 2010 (no match to orbit)

149P Mueller February 19, 2010 (no match to orbit)

157P Tritton February 20, 2010 (no match to orbit)

81P Wild February 23, 2010 (no match to orbit)

126P IRAS February 23, 2010 (no match to orbit)

2004 R1 February 24, 2010 (no match to orbit)

65P Gunn March 2, 2010 (good match to orbit)

219P LINEAR March 6, 2010 (good match to orbit)

162P Siding Spring March 8, 2010 (possible match, but too elliptical)

2001 R6 March 26, 2010 (no match to orbit)

94P Russell March 30, 2010 (good match to orbit)

30P Reinmuth April 19, 2010 (no match to orbit)

2007 VO5 April 27, 2010 (no match to orbit)

2009 K5 April 30, 2010 (no match to orbit)

104P Kowal May 5, 2010 (possible match, but too elliptical)

141P Machholz-A May 24, 2010 (no match to orbit)

141P Machholz-D May 30, 2010 (no match to orbit)

142P Ge-Wang May 31, 2010 (no match to orbit)

1978 R1 June 7, 2010 (possible match, but too elliptical)

215P NEAT June 8, 2010 (no match to orbit)

43P Wolf-Harrington July 2, 2010 (no match to orbit)

10P Tempel July 5, 2010 (possible match, but too elliptical)

1999 U3 July 19, 2010 (no match to orbit)

2P Encke August 7, 2010 (no match to orbit)

2002 S1 August 15, 2010 (no match to orbit)

2004 EW38 September 4, 2010 (no match to orbit)

2002 UY September 9, 2010 (no match to orbit)

31P Schwassmann-Wachmann 2 September 29, 2010 (possible match)

2008 FK7 September 30, 2010 (no match to orbit)

Short list of candidates based on the first criterion of orbital similarity:

116P Wild 4 July 19, 2009 (possible match to orbit)

74P Smirnova-Chernykh July 30, 2009 (possible match to orbit)

88P Howell October 12, 2009 (possible match, but too elliptical)

127P Holt-Olmstead October 21, 2009 (good match to orbit)

54P de Vico November 28, 2009 (possible match, too close to Jupiter)

100P Hartley December 6, 2009 (possible match to orbit)

2004 K2 December 15, 2009 (possible match, but too elliptical)

118P Shoemaker-Levy January 2, 2010 (good match to orbit)

82P Gehrels January 12, 2010 (possible match to orbit)

2003 XD10 January 31, 2010 (good match to orbit)

65P Gunn March 2, 2010 (good match to orbit)

219P LINEAR March 6, 2010 (good match to orbit)

162P Siding Spring March 8, 2010 (possible match, but too elliptical)

94P Russell March 30, 2010 (good match to orbit)

104P Kowal May 5, 2010 (possible match, but too elliptical)

1978 R1 June 7, 2010 (possible match, but too elliptical)

10P Tempel July 5, 2010 (possible match, but too elliptical)

31P Schwassmann-Wachmann September 29, 2010 (possible match to orbit)

Thus after studying all known comets (68) which will reach perihelion between March 2009 and September 2012, we came up with a short list of 18 possible candidates to be evaluated further. Some typical orbits for four of those 18 candidates are shown below:

Our second criterion: look for a comet which will be approaching the Sun in December of 2009

Unfortunately, Silbury of August 3 gave no clear indication of where Jupiter or that comet might be located within those two “crop orbits”, as a possible guide to picking the correct candidate. The cometary orbit at Silbury did include an “extra tuft” in one place (thereby increasing the total number of standing tufts from 19 to 20), while the Jupiter orbit at Silbury showed a “missing tuft” in one place (thereby reducing the total number of standing tufts from 24 to 23). Yet those are relatively weak criteria that cannot be used for a comprehensive search.

Still, we need to add a second criterion in order to refine our search further. After careful study, we believe that the best second criterion might be as follows: Windmill Hill of August 6, 2009 suggested that some faint comet will outburst while it is approaching the Sun in four lunar months, as indicated there by four dumbbell-type symbols for “Moon” (see /time2007f):

The fallen crop within one of those symbols for “Moon” was even patterned carefully into four standing knobs (above right), as if to confirm that there will be “four lunar months” from August 6 when the crop picture appeared, to December 2, 2009 when our comet will be bright and close to the Sun (see windmillhill2). Both of those dates are full Moons.

The symbol for “Sun” was not shown explicitly at Windmill Hill, but would be located between its fourth and fifth large expanding circles. A similar motif appeared on July 23, 2009 near Wilbur, Washington, with an extra symbol for “Sun” located off to one side, between its fourth and fifth expanding circles. (see Wilbur2009a or www.khq.com).

Second criterion: look for a comet from our short list of candidates which will be approaching the Sun in December of 2009 (or not far past it), after an initial outburst in September or October of 2009. At the same time, rank each orbital match by the first criterion more accurately as “good”, “fair” or “poor”.

116P Wild 4 July 19, 2009 (fair match to orbit) (no)

74P Smirnova-Chernykh July 30, 2009 (fair match to orbit) (no)

88P Howell October 12, 2009 (poor match to orbit) (no)

127P Holt-Olmstead October 21, 2009 (fair match to orbit) (yes)

54P de Vico November 28, 2009 (fair match to orbit) (yes)

100P Hartley December 6, 2009 (fair match to orbit) (yes)

2004 K2 December 15, 2009 (fair match to orbit) (yes)

118P Shoemaker-Levy January 2, 2010 (good match to orbit) (yes)

82P Gehrels January 12, 2010 (fair match to orbit) (yes)

2003 XD10 January 31, 2010 (good match to orbit) (yes)

65P Gunn March 2, 2010 (good match to orbit) (yes)

219P LINEAR March 6, 2010 (good match to orbit) (yes)

162P Siding Spring March 8, 2010 (poor match to orbit) (no)

94P Russell March 30, 2010 (fair match to orbit) (no)

104P Kowal May 5, 2010 (poor match to orbit) (no)

1978 R1 June 7, 2010 (poor match to orbit) (no)

10P Tempel July 5, 2010 (poor match to orbit) (no)

31P Schwassmann September 29, 2010 (poor match to orbit) (no)

Short list of candidates based on the first and second criteria combined:

127P Holt-Olmstead October 21, 2009 (fair match to orbit) (yes)

54P de Vico November 28, 2009 (fair match to orbit) (yes)

100P Hartley December 6, 2009 (fair match to orbit) (yes)

2004 K2 December 15, 2009 (fair match to orbit) (yes)

118P Shoemaker-Levy January 2, 2010 (good match to orbit) (yes)

82P Gehrels January 12, 2010 (fair match to orbit) (yes)

2003 XD10 January 31, 2010 (good match to orbit) (yes)

65P Gunn March 2, 2010 (good match to orbit) (yes)

219P LINEAR March 6, 2010 (good match to orbit) (yes)

Our third criterion: look for a comet with an orbital period of 5.9 to 6.3 Earth years

Now we have reduced our short list to nine likely candidates, from a large starting list of 68. Might any of those 2009 crop pictures contain further astronomical information, which will help us to reduce the size of our list further?

Well, at the very centre of Silbury from August 3, we can see a series of three tight circles that were clearly meant to represent the orbits of Mercury, Venus and Earth:

Next, between the two inner circles for Mercury and Venus as drawn there, we can see 15 “standing knobs” of crop, which might well be intended to tell us the orbital period of our comet. Supposing that each “knob” represents one Mercury-Venus conjunction of 0.391 years, then 15 knobs would give a time period of 15 x 0.391 = 5.9 years for our comet to rotate once about the Sun.

August 3, 2009 was itself a Mercury-Venus conjunction, which may explain why they drew a “space” (yellow asterisk) in one place, instead of a sixteenth knob. If we count that “space” as well, then we get 16 x 0.391 = 6.3 years for our comet to rotate once about the Sun.

The cometary orbit at Silbury was marked out using 19 standing tufts. For a three-repeat returning comet, could that number be meant to give (19 / 3) = 6.3 years? The Jupiter orbit at Silbury was marked out using 24 standing tufts, where (24 / 2) = 12 lies close to Jupiter’s orbital period of 11.86 years.

Now if we return to our short list, and look to see which comets have an orbital period of 5.9 to 6.3 Earth years, we find the following results.

Table 1. Which comets show an orbital period of 5.9 to 6.3 Earth years?

Comet

Orbital period in years

Matches crop picture?

Expected magnitude without outburst

127P

6.4

yes

18

54P

7.4

no

16

100P

6.3

yes

16

2004 K2

5.5

no

19

118P

6.4

yes

12

82P

8.4

no

17

2003 XD10

6.3

yes

20

65P

6.8

no

12

219P

7.0

no

17

Only four comets out of nine show orbital periods within (or close to) the specified range.

Should we be looking for a comet with a short orbital period of 3.6 to 3.9 years?

Alternatively, if those 15 standing knobs as drawn at Silbury were meant to describe Mercury-Earth conjunctions of 0.241 years, then we might calculate 15 x 0.241 = 3.62 to 16 x 0.241 = 3.85 years for the orbital period of our comet.

There are hardly any known comets with such a short period, which are expected to reach perihelion during 2009 or 2010. The best candidate might be 169P Neat with an orbital period of 4.2 years. It will reach perihelion on November 30, 2009 (close to December 2, 2009) at an expected magnitude of 12, and will be very close to (or headed toward) Earth and Moon at that time (see below).

Another possible choice might be 2P Encke with an orbital period of 3.3 years, which will not reach perihelion however until August 7, 2010. Both of those comets show such highly elliptical orbits, that they did not pass our first criterion for “orbital similarity” described above.

Our fourth criterion: look for a comet which will lie close to Earth and Moon in December of 2009

Finally, as a fourth useful criterion for correctness, we can require that the exploding comet should be approaching Earth and Moon during December of 2009, as well as the Sun. That interesting feature was shown clearly at Windmill Hill on August 6:

Out of nine possible candidates which show suitable orbits, and will approach the Sun in December of 2009, how many will also approach Earth and Moon?

127P Holt-Olmstead October 21, 2009 (fair match to orbit) (maybe)

54P de Vico November 28, 2009 (fair match to orbit) (no)

100P Hartley December 6, 2009 (fair match to orbit) (no)

2004 K2 December 15, 2009 (fair match to orbit) (no)

118P Shoemaker-Levy January 2, 2010 (good match to orbit) (yes)

82P Gehrels January 12, 2010 (fair match to orbit) (no)

2003 XD10 January 31, 2010 (good match to orbit) (yes)

65P Gunn March 2, 2010 (good match to orbit) (no)

219P LINEAR March 6, 2010 (good match to orbit) (no)

Comets which passed the third criterion concerning “orbital period” have been underlined. The best matches to this fourth criterion are shown below:

A small crop picture in Germany on July 19, 2009 likewise suggested that some unknown comet (circled) will “line up” with Earth and Mars around January 29, 2010, when Mars reaches opposition to Earth (see berlin2009a or www.kornkreise-forschung.de):

It would be unwise to use that German crop picture as a fifth criterion, because no one can be sure whether it is real or a fake. Yet if it is real, then only two comets from our short list could meet the astronomical alignment as shown there (see above). They are both already on our final shortlist for a close approach to Earth and Moon.

Short list of candidates based on the first, second, third and fourth criteria combined:

(a) 118P Shoemaker-Levy, perihelion January 2, 2010, orbital period 6.45 years, three past repeats, expected magnitude 12 (without outburst),

(b) 2003 XD10, perihelion January 31, 2010, orbital period 6.29 years, one past repeat, expected magnitude 20 (without outburst), or

(c) 127P Holt-Olmstead, perihelion October 21, 2009, orbital period 6.39 years, three past repeats, expected magnitude 18 (without outburst)

(see ast.cam.ac.uk or aerith.net or aerith.net).

Comet 118P Shoemaker-Levy 4 would certainly the brightest and best characterized of these three comets. Hence it might plausibly be expected to outburst as it approaches the Sun during the autumn of 2009? Yet its date of perihelion as January 2, 2010 is somewhat later than the date of December 2, 2009 suggested at Windmill Hill.

Could they be telling us about some faint comet that is not currently in the astronomical database here on Earth?

The inner ring of planetary symbols at Windmill Hill gives a date of December 2, 2008 (one year before December 2, 2009)

To conclude, let us discuss briefly two rings of planetary symbols which were shown at Windmill Hill on August 6, 2009. They might be expected to provide detailed information about some upcoming cometary outburst, but have been hard to interpret with confidence so far.

Now after further study, we can state confidently that the inner ring at Windmill Hill shows a symbol for Earth and Moon, accompanied by two large circles for Jupiter and Saturn, plus two medium-sized circles for Venus and Mars. All five of those symbols then code (by means of their orbital locations) for a date of December 2, 2008, which is precisely one year before our exploding comet is supposed to approach the Sun:

The outer ring of planetary symbols at Windmill Hill seems to provide three past dates of perihelion for a short-period comet

The outer ring at Windmill Hill seems to shows three more large circles for Jupiter as J1, J2 or J3 (because Saturn moves too slowly to serve as a useful time marker), along with five more medium-sized circles for Venus or Mars (but we cannot tell which). It may perhaps code for three dates in the past when our unknown comet approached the Sun:

Yet without knowing which comet is about to explode, the precise meaning of those slightly ambiguous symbols cannot be determined with any certainty. Interestingly enough, the orbital intervals shown there for Jupiter match 4.0 to 4.5 years (or one-third of its 11.9-year orbit), and not 5.9 to 6.3 years as favoured above.

If we are looking for a short-period comet that has reached perihelion several times in the recent past, then comet 169P NEAT (see aerith.net) might be our best candidate. It will reach perihelion on November 30, 2009 (very close to December 2, 2009) while headed directly for Earth and Moon. It will also line up close to Earth and Mars in January of 2010. Yet it shows such a poor match to the two “crop orbits” drawn at Silbury or Windmill Hill, that it was excluded from our current shortlist of candidates for that reason.

Summary and conclusions

We have tried here to describe all that may be gleaned scientifically from the crop pictures of 2009, concerning a bright comet which has seemingly been predicted to explode or “outburst” soon in Earth’s skies. The first stages of outburst are expected in September or October of 2009, although there may be a second outburst in November, before it passes close to the Sun in December of 2009.

Using information provided in those 2009 crop pictures about orbital shape, dates of approach to Sun or Earth, and length of orbital period, we have reached a shortlist of cometary candidates with a long orbital period of 5.9 to 6.3 years that includes 118P Shoemaker Levy, 2003 XD10 or 127P Holt-Olmstead. We have also noted one possible candidate with a short orbital period of 3.9 to 4.5 years as 169P Neat.

Once (or if) any faint comet does explode soon in Earth’s skies, during the autumn of 2009, then it will be interesting to go back and re-evaluate all of the crop pictures cited here, in light of astronomical images from the future. Only those crop artists seem to know what is going to happen soon, and not ordinary humans on Earth.

The CMM Research Group

P.S. We would like to thank Olivier Morel, Jack Turner, Jack Roderick, Lucy Pringle, John Montgomery, Russell Stannard, KHQ Channel 6, Stian, Frank Laumen, Adam Beamish and Andreas Muller for some of the photographs or drawings used here.

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SUBTITLES IN ENGLISH, ESPAÑOL, PORTUGUÊS

Click upon the circle after the small square for captions

MUFON

How to Digitally Record/Video a UFO sighting:


Como registar digitalmente ou gravar um vídeo de um avistamento de um UFO:




Stabilize the camera on a tripod. If there is no tripod, then set it on top of a stable, flat surface. If that is not possible lean against a wall to stabilize your body and prevent the camera from filming in a shaky, unsteady manner.

Estabilize a camera com um tripé. Se não tiver um tripé, então coloque-a em cima de uma superfície estável. Se não for possível, então encoste-se a uma parede para estabilizar o corpo e evitar que a camera registe de maneira tremida e instável.

Provide visual reference points for comparison. This includes the horizon, treetops, lampposts, houses, and geographical landmarks (i.e., Horsetooth Reservoir, Mt. Adams, etc.) Provide this in the video whenever is appropriate and doesn’t detract from what your focus is, the UFO.

Forneça pontos visuais de referência para comparação. Isso inclui o horizonte, cimo das árvores, postes de iluminação, pontos de referência geográficos (como o Reservatório de Horsetooth, Mone Adams, etc) Forneça esses pontos no vídeo sempre que for apropriado e não se distraia do que é o seu foco, o UFO/a Nave.

Narrate your videotape. Provide details of the date, time, location, and direction (N,S,E,W) you are looking in. Provide your observations on the weather, including approximate temperature, windspeed, any visible cloud cover or noticeable weather anomalies or events. Narrate on the shape, size, color, movements, approximate altitude of the UFO, etc and what it appears to be doing. Also include any unusual physical, psychological or emotional sensations you might have. Narrate any visual reference points on camera so they correlate with what the viewer will see, and thereby will be better able to understand.

Faça a narração do vídeo. Forneça pormenores sobre a data, hora, local e direcção (Norte, Sul, Este, Oeste) que está a observar. Faça observações sobre as condições atmosféricas, incluindo a temperatura aproximada, velocidade do vento, quantidade de nuvens, anomalias ou acontecimentos meteorológicos evidentes. Descreva a forma, o tamanho, a cor, os movimentos, a altitude aproximada onde se encontra o UFO/nave, etc e o que aparenta estar a fazer. Inclua também quaisquer aspectos pouco habituais de sensações físicas, psicológicas ou emocionais que possa ter. Faça a narração de todos os pontos de referência visual que o espectador irá ver e que, deste modo, será capaz de compreender melhor.

Be persistent and consistent. Return to the scene to videotape and record at this same location. If you have been successful once, the UFO sightings may be occurring in this region regularly, perhaps for specific reasons unknown, and you may be successful again. You may also wish to return to the same location at a different time of day (daylight hours) for better orientation and reference. Film just a minute or two under “normal” circumstances for comparison. Write down what you remember immediately after. As soon as you are done recording the experience/event, immediately write down your impressions, memories, thoughts, emotions, etc. so it is on the record in writing. If there were other witnesses, have them independently record their own impressions, thoughts, etc. Include in this exercise any drawings, sketches, or diagrams. Make sure you date and sign your documentation.

Seja persistente e não contraditório. Volte ao local da cena e registe o mesmo local. Se foi bem sucedido uma vez, pode ser que nessa região ocorram avistamentos de UFOs/naves com regularidade, talvez por razões específicas desconhecidas, e talvez possa ser novamente bem sucedido. Pode também desejar voltar ao mesmo lugar a horas diferentes do dia (durante as horas de luz)para ter uma orientação e referência melhor. Filme apenas um ,inuto ou dois em circunstâncias “normais” para ter um termo de comparação. Escreva tudo o que viu imediatamente após o acontecimento. Logo após ter feito o registo da experiência/acontecimento, escreva imediatamente as impressões, memórias, pensamentos, emoções, etc para que fiquem registadas por escrito. Se houver outras testemunhas, peça-lhes para registar independentemente as suas próprias impressões, pensamentos, etc. Inclua quaisquer desenhos, esbolos, diagramas. Certifique-se que data e assina o seu documento/testemunho.

Always be prepared. Have a digital camera or better yet a video camera with you, charged and ready to go, at all times. Make sure you know how to use your camera (and your cell phone video/photo camera) quickly and properly. These events can occur suddenly, unexpectedly, and often quite randomly, so you will need to be prepared.

Esteja sempre preparado, Tenha sempre uma camera digital, melhor ainda, uma camera vídeo consigo, carregada e pronta a usar sempre que necessário. Certifique-se que sabe como lidar com a sua camera (ou com o seu celular/camera fotográfica) rápida e adequadamente. Esses acontecimentos podem acontecer súbita e inesperadamente e, por vezes, acidentalmente, por isso, necessita estar preparado.

Look up. Be prepared. Report. Share.

Olhe para cima, Esteja preparado, Relate, Partilhe.

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